07 Jul

PrizeRebel Review – The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

PrizeRebel Review – The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

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PrizeRebel is a website where you get rewarded for performing various online activities. They can range from:

  • Filling out surveys
  • Watching videos
  • Signing up for trials (products or services)
  • Referring other people

These are just a fraction of ways you can earn rewards on PrizeRebel.

 

How It Works

As with most survey sites, you have to be over 18 years old to sign up, or have parental consent if you’re between 13 and 18 years old.

Once you sign up, you’ll be immediately presented with “bonus” offers like this one:

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You can take your time answering each question or just move onto the main site. The next popup screen will tell you to pick a “tour.” Merely learning about the site and filling out your profile will earn you easy points.

PrizeRebel recommends Chrome or Firefox for optimal experience. You should also disable your ad blocker to access some parts of the website.

 

How to Earn Points

PrizeRebel has their own rewards system using “points,” which you can earn and redeem for various prizes. Earning points is straightforward. Under the “Earn” link, you’ll be able to access offers, surveys, videos, etc.

Each link corresponds to different ways you can earn points. For example, on the “Offers” page, you’ll come across something like the following:

  • Like PrizeRebel’s Facebook page (1 point)
  • Register for FabKids (30 points)
  • Register for Zulily (35 points)
  • Register for iPoll (45 points)
  • Sign up for AllState (75 points)

There are pages of offers similar to these. Your offers may be different depending on your profile.

If you want to maximize your ROI on PrizeRebel, you’d do well concentrating a bulk of your time on the “Surveys” page. Getting a match can take several tries, but you can get more points for surveys than offers. Find a good pace for completing offers and surveys to turbo-charge your earnings.

As you will find on the “Earn” page, there are other ways to earn points. You can watch videos, which is not recommended because of poor return on time investment. You can perform “Tasks,” which works sort of like Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, where you perform micro-tasks. This also has a poor ROI, but the option is available.

 

Types of Rewards & How to Redeem

On PrizeRebel, $1 is equivalent to 100 points.

PrizeRebel offers different categories of gift cards, ranging from retail (Best Buy, Forever 21, Whole Foods, HEB, Amazon, etc.), online games, books, electronics, prepaid cell minutes, and so forth.

If you want straight up cash, PayPal is the best reward you can ask for. PayPal rewards range from $5 to $500. To redeem a $5 PayPal, amount, you need to earn 500 points.

You can redeem for as little as $2 on Amazon gift card, but only if you are silver level or above. You start out as bronze level on PrizeRebel and get upgraded to silver after 1,000 points.

The points for moving up the level are not cumulative. For example, the 1,000 points you earned to move up from bronze to silver don’t count for moving up from silver to gold. For that, you’d need additional 3,000 points.

The rewards are processed around the clock, so if you claim an item, you’ll generally get it within 24 hours.

 

Pros – The Pros of PrizeRebel

The first thing you’ll notice is how user-friendly and pleasant the interface is. PrizeRebel is probably one of the nicest survey sites out there in terms of design. Everything is laid out plainly and the menus are easy to navigate.

When you go to the “Offers” page, it spells out clearly what you need to do to complete an offer. Here’s an example for the iPolls registration:

“Reach the last page after you complete registration. Click the confirmation email link. Complete registration and demographic profile.”

That’s pretty straightforward and you don’t have to wonder exactly how far you have to go when completing an offer.

One of the best features of PrizeRebel is how it’s goal-oriented. The website cleverly uses the S.M.A.R.T. goals – Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Realistic, and Time-bound. To complete the Level 1 Challenge, you need 140 points. You have around 5 hours to complete this challenge. There’s a timer and bar graph to show your progress, so there’s no question how many more points you need.

Once you complete your daily challenge, you get extra points and a badge – certainly not earth shattering, but it’s a fun way to keep track of your progress and motivate you to earn points faster.

Another positive thing about PrizeRebel is that you won’t find too many complaints online about its legitimacy. Of course, some people will always complain and have bad experience with any survey site. PrizeRebel is not immune to negative reviews, but as far as whether it’s a scam or not, you’ll find fair assessments.

 

Cons – The Cons of PrizeRebel

This isn’t specific to PrizeRebel; it’s the fact of any survey site that getting a matching survey can be a test in patience. You can fill out 10 or more pre-survey questions just to be hit with “You don’t qualify for this survey.”

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(The dreaded “This opportunity was not a good match with your demographics” screen)

The ever-so upbeat message, “You can still get a survey approved. Continue below!” encourages you to try harder to qualify. Again, this fault is not unique to PrizeRebel, but it can get frustrating. Some links to surveys or downloading games are broken, which can add to your frustration.

(if you want to use a sight that is more likely to have surveys available, click here to check out MySurvey)

 

How to Optimize Your Experience of PrizeRebel

Earning rewards on PrizeRebel is obviously a time-consuming endeavor and you shouldn’t hope to make this your primary site for earning a living online. However, if you invest a few hours a day you would otherwise spend watching Netflix, it’s a good way to make a few extra bucks.

To have the best experience possible on PrizeRebel, it’s essential to be organized. Have a valid email address dedicated just for PrizeRebel (and other survey sites), because as you sign up for multiple offers, you’ll be hit with sponsored offers from advertisers.

While there are many “free” offers that ask you for nothing more than your email address and some information, you’ll probably earn more money by completing offers with trials.

If you sign up for free trials, whether for a week or 30 days, make sure to keep track of your dates and cancel your trial before the deadline. This way, you can avoid your credit card getting charged automatically.

While you may be wary of giving out your credit card information, many trials work this way. As long as you stay on top of things and cancel on time, you’ll encounter no problem. In the worst-case scenario, you can just stick to free offers and still earn decent number of points.

You’ll have ample opportunities to download and try out things: games, RealPlayer (did you know it’s still around?!), coupons, etc. These only give you 20 or so points, but it’s a good alternative to surveys if you’re frustrated with not being able to qualify for them. Small points do add up!

Watching videos and doing tasks might not be worth your time, because you’re spending so much time for so little points. These options do exist if you want variety, but a bulk of your time should be spent on completing offers and finding surveys you qualify for.

 

Conclusion

Overall, PrizeRebel is a rewards-earning site that’s not extraordinary, but solid. You’ll earn rewards based on surveys you take, registering for offers, watching videos, and miscellaneous tasks you complete. It’s a fairly simple way to earn a few extra bucks in your down time.

You can redeem rewards with as low as 500 points (200 points if you are a silver level or above). 500 points will get you a $5 PayPal within 24 hours. You can get 500 points easily by filling out your profile, taking a few surveys, and registering for offers. The low earning requirement for redemption makes PrizeRebel an attractive site.

PrizeRebel has a pleasant interface and is easy to navigate. You’ll have a clear guidance for each survey or offer you complete. There’s a nice progress bar that lets you keep track of how many points you earned for the day, providing extra motivation. Downloading, trying out games, and earning points can be fun if you’re into games.

The fast payout, within 24 hours, beats getting checks in the mail any day.

The site is not without cons, though. Surveys can be hard to qualify for, although that’s not a problem limited to PrizeRebel. Links to offers and surveys are sometimes broken, even if they’re shown as active on the main page. The site restricts you to Chrome or Firefox for best browsing experience.

If you can get past the negatives and score some surveys, PrizeRebel offers a solid way to spend your free time and make some money. From the reviews gathered around the web, people are in agreement that the site is legit and easy to use.

That being said, there are better sites out there. Swagbucks and MySurvey are well known for their excellent interfaces and wide variety of surveys. If you visit both of these sites, it is highly unlikely that you will leave without doing something to earn points towards a reward. If you want more information, we did honest, in depth reviews of both sites: click here for the Swagbucks review or click here for the MySurvey review, or just click on the links above to experience the sites for yourself!

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